What the Movies Don’t Show You About the Psychiatric Unit

What the Movies Don’t Show You About the Psychiatric Unit

I remember repeatedly telling my friends I did not want to go to the psychiatric hospital for months.

I was terrified and I did not want to be labeled as “crazy.” Every time someone asked if they should call the police, I said “no.” Who would?

After attempting suicide, I found myself in the emergency room being evaluated by a psychiatrist, and he told me I had two choices: voluntarily or involuntarily check in, where I would then be forced to check in to inpatient. I decided to go so I could have more control over the process.

I was dehydrated and, to say the least I was mentally on another planet. Everything seemed like a blur.

I was asked to remove my clothing and valuables and change into scrubs, and to place everything into a plastic bag. It was around 1 p.m., and after almost nine hours (seemed like forever), I got into a wheelchair and a nurse pushed me into the elevator and brought me to the top level of the hospital (4th floor).As I went through the double doors that were locked from both the inside and outside, I saw patients in a common area watching TV.

I was then brought to a room with one of the medical assistants and he took my vitals. And, as I began to process what was happening to me, I cried like a baby. I thought to myself, “What did I sign up for?”

I was escorted to my room, asked the nurse to leave the light on and the door open, and then I cried myself to sleep. The next morning when I got up, I noticed the blue walls, a door that led to a toilet, a sink, a locked window with no view and my roommate sleeping. I did not eat or leave my room because I was scared.

I’ve never been so scared in my life. All I could think about was the psychiatric units in the movies. I thought someone was going to attack me. There were check-ins every 15 minutes by the staff, and you are assigned a social worker, nurse and psychiatrist. You get three meals each day and a snack. You have to ask to take a shower and wash your clothes. I said to myself, “I must be dreaming or I am in jail.”

My social worker suggested I go into the day room and participate in therapy. At this point, I was willing to try anything because I wanted to go home. And to my surprise, it was nothing like the movies.

I walked into a therapy session of emotional bingo. As I listened to the patients talk, I shared their hurt and pain. They shared stories of abuse, grief and untreated childhood traumas.

I decided to go to another session later in the day — music therapy. We listened to music and did arts and crafts, and even though I felt out of place in the unit, it was so relaxing.I met entrepreneurs, overworked-mothers, people with college degrees and a former police officer; people like me and you.

The movies do not show you the psychiatric unit can be a calm and peaceful place. Where I was, it allowed people with mental illness to become stable and begin to work on his or her issues through medication, therapy, writing, reading and resting. The staff was kind, and really wanted to see me succeed.

During my stay, I made amazing connections and started new friendships. It is a great feeling when you meet someone who identifies with you, and does not judge you. My old medication stopped working so I was given new medication, and within a few hours my suicidal thoughts stopped. I took an active roll in creating my treatment plan in order to have an effective recovery process.

After I was discharged, I was placed in a partial hospitalization; I stayed at the hospital for six hours, five days a week, but I was able to go home. I thought I did not belong. I have a master’s degree, I started my own company and two organizations, I have people who look up to me and love me, I have my own apartment, and I drive my own car. Mental illness has nothing to do with your educational, professional or socio-economic background; sometimes it is genetic or simply life, or maybe a combination of the two.

Beyond the Lights: Celebrities and Mental Illness

Beyond the Lights: Celebrities and Mental Illness

As the conversation of mental health and illness gradually comes to the forefront of national attention, the month of May is the perfect time to raise awareness. For some reason, we tend to stigmatize mental illness and do not see it as a “real” or life-threatening illness like cancer, AIDS, or diabetes. Mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder, depression, social anxiety, and schizophrenia are not made up or less important than any other disease.

In fact, approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S.—43.8 million (about 18%)—experience mental illness in a given year, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and unfortunately, we perceive people with a mental illness as just “crazy.”

However, what we fail to realize is that people with mental illness are more than the individuals walking down the street talking to themselves; mental illness affects everyday, functional people, and even celebrities.

In fact, the thought of a celebrity battling a mental illness might seem far-fetched for some. We tend to believe celebrities are unstoppable and perfect because they have money, power, and fame. We judge celebrities from the outside looking in and do not see them when the cameras are off and they too have to manage their emotions, thoughts, and illnesses like the average person.

Jenifer Lewis encourages others who suffer from mental illness to love themselves. Photo courtesy of Pinterest.

We love to see the hilarious, sassy, and powerful characters that Jenifer Lewis portrays in movies and shows such as The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Think Like A Man, and Black-ish. But after hiding her 17-year battle with bipolar disorder and 10 years of being on medication, Lewis spoke about her mental illness on Exhale TV.

“What it is, is that you want to do it without the meds,” Lewis says. “You want to get off and say, ‘I’m healthy. I got wheat-grass and I am eating good. I can do this on my own,’ and then you throw the meds away. Don’t do that.”

Lewis also stated that her illness was triggered by the death of her father, but she encouraged people to love themselves.

The exact cause of bipolar disorder is unknown, but a combination of genetics, environment, and altered brain structure and chemistry can play a role. Bipolar disorder is an episode of mood swings ranging from depressive lows to manic highs.

Manic episodes might include symptoms such as high energy, reduced need for sleep, and loss of connection to reality. Symptoms of depressive episodes might include low energy, low motivation, and loss of interest in daily activities. Mood episodes last days to months at a time and might also be associated with suicidal thoughts.

Disney Channel superstar, actress, and singer Selena Gomez struggles with anxiety, panic attacks, and depression disorders in addition to dealing with lupus.

Panic disorder is an urge of overwhelming fear and anxiety. Your heart pounds and you can’t breathe. You might even feel like you’re dying or going crazy. If left untreated, panic attacks can lead to panic disorder and other problems, according to helpguide.org.

Depression and anxiety disorders are different, but people with depression often experience symptoms similar to those of an anxiety disorder, such as nervousness, irritability, and problems sleeping and concentrating. But each disorder has its own causes and its own emotional and behavioral symptoms.

During her speech at the American Music Awards, Gomez talks about her personal struggle with anxiety and depression.

Disney Star Selena Gomez is one of many celebrities who suffer from depression and anxiety. Photo courtesy of Pinterest

“I had to stop. Cause I had everything, and I was absolutely broken inside,” Gomez confesses. “And I kept it all together enough to where I would never let you down, but I kept it too much together, to where I let myself down. I don’t want to see your bodies on Instagram, I want to see what’s in here [puts a hand on heart]. I’m not trying to get validation, nor do I need it anymore.”

According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, many people who develop depression have a history of an anxiety disorder earlier in life. There is no evidence that one disorder causes the other, but clear evidence suggests that many people suffer from both disorders.

The lesson that we learn as children—don’t judge a book by its cover—is necessary when we look at people, celebrities included, with mental illness. It is important to think before you speak, learn about mental illness, and offer compassion for those who deal with these illnesses.

No amount of money, power, or fame can make you happy or protect you from a mental illness. But what we can also learn from this is that people with mental illness are not alone, and most do not allow their illness to stop them from living and achieving their dreams.

If you are feeling suicidal, please call the suicide hotline at 1-800-273-8255. If you are depressed, struggling mentally, or know someone who is, visit National Alliance on Mental Illness or the Anxiety and Depression Association of America to find a therapist in your community as well as other resources.

Faith and Family: 5 Reasons Why You Should Watch TV One’s ‘The Manns’

Faith and Family: 5 Reasons Why You Should Watch TV One’s ‘The Manns’

In the world of ratchet television programming, balance is certainly needed. So, when wholesome family shows are created, it is worth mentioning. The Manns, starring gospel power couple David and Tamela Mann, joins the TV One family with a docu-series highlighting Christian values, family drama, and fun.

Tamela Mann juggles the hats of mom, fashion designer, singer, and actress while her husband David Mann manages the roles of dad, actor, comedian, and business owner of Tillymann Entertainment Inc., the family business. Above all, the Manns enjoy spending time with their four children, eight grandchildren, extended family and friends.

So, as if all of that isn’t enough, here are five more reasons why The Manns is the show to watch:

1. It’s a great example of Christian marriage and family.

David and Tamela Mann are a God-fearing couple who have been married for almost 30 years. Through family and internal conflicts, viewers are able to witness how a family’s faith is tested each week throughout the series.

For the next several weeks, the Manns will experience everything from Tamela’s near-death experience during weight-loss surgery to her unconditional support for her daughter Tia who considers the surgery. Then, there are the episodes when the gospel power couple must address everything from their children’s addiction to their electronic devices to their daughter Porcia’s surprise boyfriend.

But, through it all, it is their trust in God that holds them together.

2. It’s hilarious.

Get ready! The Manns will give you a heartfelt “I can’t breathe” laugh as you witness hilarious moments, such as David Sr. and David Jr. “shouting” in heels and David Sr. facing his claustrophobia, or fear of confined spaces, and fear of mice. You don’t want to miss it!

3. It’s Real.

The Manns do not paint a picture of perfection as Christians. They are transparent about their issues and are intentional in showing viewers how they overcome them. However, viewers are also able to witness special moments, such as when Tamela wins her first Grammy and launches a clothing line.

4. You will be encouraged.

The faith journey is never easy, but some fail to realize that celebrities are not exempt from pain and disappointment. However, the Manns exists as a reality show that emphasizes the importance of keeping God first.

5. You can watch it guilt-free.

Thanks to reality shows like The Manns, you no longer have to refer to reality TV as a “guilty pleasure.” Unlike many of its counterparts, The Manns is for the entire family.

Can’t get enough of The Manns? You can also catch David and Tamela on The Manns Family Tour with their son David Jr., and daughters Porchia and Tia or join the conversation by connecting via social media on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook (@tvonetv) using the hashtag #THEMANNS.

Watch The Manns every Tuesday at 8 p.m. ET on TV One.